Transitional Justice

Published: 
March, 2016

This paper examines the role of mixed and multi-level methods datasets used to inform evaluations of transitional justice mechanisms. The Colombia reparation program for victims of war is used to illustrate how a convergent design involving multiple datasets can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a complex transitional justice mechanism.

Published: 
July, 2014

This report presents the results of a mixed-methods study conducted in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) between November and December 2013, to assess the population’s perceptions, knowledge, and attitudes about peace, security and justice. The study included a survey of 5,166 randomly selected adult residents, to provide results that are representative of the adult population of territories and major urban areas in the provinces of North Kivu and South Kivu, and the district of Ituri.

Published: 
July, 2014

This report presents the results of a mixed-methods study conducted in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, to assess the population’s perceptions, knowledge, and attitudes about security and justice. The study included a survey of 1,000 randomly selected adult residents, to provide results that are representative of the population of the city of Abidjan. The specific objectives of this study were to:

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About This Program

Transitional justice refers to the range of approaches that societies moving from repressive rule or armed conflict use to deal with legacy of human rights abuse as they progress towards peace, democracy, the rule of law, and respect for individual and collective rights. HHI’s transitional justice program has two main aims: first, to provide evidence that will make existing transitional justice instruments more effective in meeting the needs and expectations of victims; and second, to explore alternative approaches to transitional justice, which go beyond the concept of a toolkit, and allow for more innovative and flexible solutions. The new paradigm would depart from a “one size fits all” approach to provide solutions tailored for people’s specific needs, aspirations, and priorities.