Sub-Saharan Africa

Stuart Campo is a Researcher with the Signal Program on Human Security and Technology at the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative (HHI) of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. In this capacity, he supports translational research on humanitarian technologies, standards and ethics.

Caitlin Howarth is a Researcher on early warning systems at the Signal Program on Human Security and Technology at Harvard Humanitarian Initiative (HHI). Howarth was formerly Reports Manager for the Satellite Sentinel Project at HHI from 2011-2012.

Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) are now being employed as a standard part of mass atrocity response, evidence collection, and research by non-governmental organizations, governments, and the private sector. Deployment of these tools and techniques occur for a variety of stated reasons, most notably the ostensible goal of “protecting” vulnerable populations.

Humanitarian agencies project that more than 20 million people are at risk of severe food insecurity, starvation, and famine this summer in Yemen, South Sudan, Somalia, and Northeastern Nigeria. Common to all these contexts is the onset and prevalence of armed conflict.

How much responsibility do humanitarian organizations have to protect the staff they send into the field? Due to the often austere, volatile, or insecure nature of humanitarian response settings, aid workers have long recognized the inherent personal and organizational risks of humanitarian action.

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